Tag Archive for immune system

90% Of Hypothyroid Patients Have Hashimoto’s – How Could This Affect You?

Most people who are dealing with low thyroid function actually have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease. Statistics show that 27 million American have low thyroid (hypothyroid) and 90% of those with hypoythyroid have Hashimoto’s.

Thyroid hormones, color:free

Hashimoto’s is an immune disease and as with all autoimmune diseases, cannot be healed without balancing the immune system. With Hashimoto’s, the person’s immune system is attacking their own thyroid gland. There are frequently other body systems being attacked as well.

One thing I often see with thyroid patients is the preoccupation to get their TSH in range. This is like trying to put out a campfire by putting water on it while the fire is actually being continually lit from below with an unlimited amount of kindling. Basically, it’s futile.

Campfire:free

A much more effective approach is to address the immune system. Here are 3 tips for doing just that:

1. Remove offending foods that are known to cause inflammation. These are grains, dairy, sugar (yes, that means honey, maple syrup and agave) and peanuts for starters. This means, “don’t eat them at all”…not “eat them sometimes”. Being vigilant is important. Think of it like weeding a garden…consistency and diligence is what keeps out those weeds and it’s the same thing with inflammation.

If you find this difficult to do, it’s because you are addicted to the caseomorphins in dairy and the gluteomorphins in grains. (Yep, the last part of those words is like “morphine” and they are highly addictive foods.) After the first week most people adjust to not eating them and start to feel better, but everyone is different.

2. Take Vitamin D. Most people who have low thyroid function are also very low in vitamin D. It doesn’t matter if you live in a sunny climate…the hypothyroid situation often makes it difficult to absorb the vitamin D from the sun. So yes, get that sunshine because it’s great for your mood and more, but don’t depend on it for your vitamin D.

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Take an emulsified version of vitamin D that has cofactors (cod liver oil and other cofactors) in the product. Capsules and tablets are more difficult for your system to absorb, liquids are better. Get your vitamin D 20 OH checked and if it’s low, supplement and then check it again in about 12 weeks. You need the D for your immune system, your mood, your brain function, your hormones and your bones.

3. Reduce stress and get more rest. Yes, I know it’s easy to say and harder to do, but it’s very important for a person with Hashimoto’s. Your body needs downtime to release and relax, take a break from what’s going on outside of you and within your own system. For free short audios to relax go to www.DrElena.com/morejoy for a 3 minute and a 7 minute audio relaxation.

Your body also needs sleep to balance your immune system. Sometimes you may need more sleep than other times. With Hashimoto’s your system may fluctuate between high thyroid and low thyroid. For example, you might go back and forth between anxiety, insomnia and diarrhea…and depression, fatigue and constipation. Whether low or high thyroid, digestive symptoms and complaints are usually present and need to be addressed.

woman sleeping:free

Remember, it’s your immune system that needs to be addressed. That is where the focus needs to be for healing.

Check out the 2 free short audios (3 minutes and 7 minutes) here and your’ll also get a short special report, “10 Keys for Bringing More Joy into Your Life”.

Yin yang with rainbow color border:free

Yours in health, healing and happiness,

Dr. Elena 😉

Dr. Elena Michaels is a naturopathic doctor, holistic psychotherapist and clinical hypnotherapist who has been helping people access their inner innate healing power for over 30 years. Having personally overcome many health challenges including cancer and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (autoimmune disease), her passion is helping others regain their health and vitality, taking control of their life.  

 

Thyroid, Hashimoto’s, TSH and YOU

Frustrated WomanPeople come into my office with anxiety, depression, weight concerns, hair loss, insomnia, heart palpitations, digestive issues, feeling cold frequently, brain fog, memory issues and other concerns.

 

They are often told by their doctors that they are “fine” and “normal” yet they feel feel that something is just not right with them. Sometimes their doctor may suggest antidepressants because the person has continued to “complain”.

Thyroid issues are often involved in these situations. If there is elevated TSH (according to the bell curve on the doctor’s lab results sheet) T4 medication (Synthroid, levothyroxine, etc.) is prescribed.

There may be no discernible results from taking the medication and the person still feels awful, or there may be minimal improvement.

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Looking only at the TSH values and not addressing the symptoms and concerns of the person, is like taking your car into the shop when it isn’t running well and asking the mechanic to only look at the rear left tire!

There is so much more to addressing the underlying mechanisms creating the symptoms. People will tell me their doctor “ran tons of tests” yet when I get a copy of the labs it isn’t even close to the very basic tests I run to find out what is going with a person. How can someone be told they are “fine” and “normal” when the tests aren’t even done?

The TSH values tend to jump around, going up and down. Trying to get TSH in range is not the most effective way to address the situation. Since more than 90% of low thyroid (hypothyroid) cases are really undiagnosed Hashimoto’s (autoimmune thyroid), it becomes more of an immune system issue. The immune system is attacking the thyroid gland and often other body systems and organs as well. As the thyroid gland continues to be attacked, symptoms become more disconcerting and the person seeks help and direction. By the time they come into my office they are frustrated, exhausted and often angry that so much time has elapsed without getting the help they wanted from their doctor.

The blood tests for Hashimoto’s are TPO (thyroid peroxidase) and TGB or TGA (thyroglobulin) antibodies. Close to 10% of us test positive for these antibodies. Most commonly the tests aren’t even done but when they are done, there may not even be any symptoms. However, left unaddressed, symptoms will develop over time as the thyroid gland (and possibly other tissues) are destroyed. Another issue is that the antibodies go up and down, so just because they don’t show up on a test, doesn’t mean they aren’t present…the test may have been run when the antibodies were in their “low” cycle.

Insurance companies are now being more strict with what they cover. Because of this, doctors are often reluctant to run antibody and other tests that could provide the information needed to figure out what is really going on.

Managing the immune system is the most effective way to address Hashimoto’s. I see chat groups and facebook pages with people (mostly women) trying desperately to find a doctor that can “get the right medication and dosage to get their TSH balanced”. That isn’t the answer…addressing the immune system yields much more satisfying and healing results.

If you feel frustrated with your path toward health, have not been improving or getting the help you need, let me help you.

I’ve been there…misdiagnosed, watching my life pass by, wondering if I would ever feel like myself again, too exhausted to be motivated or excited about anything and feeling depressed and anxious about all of it.

I can help you learn how to get control and manage your health, address your immune system, regain your balance and power and move forward creating a wonderful life for yourself. With the right tools and your own commitment to healing, you can regain your vitality, enthusiasm, energy and joy.

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I look forward to hearing from you and helping you on your journey toward health!

Dr. Elena

 

Dr. Elena Michaels is a naturopathic doctor, holistic psychotherapist and clinical hypnotherapist who has been helping people access their inner innate healing power for over 30 years.  Having personally overcome many health challenges including cancer and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (autoimmune disease), her passion is helping others regain their health and vitality, taking control of their life.  

Go to DrElena.com for helpful handouts.

 

 

 

My Favorite Tea For A Cold Night Or Whenever I Need Extra Balancing

Even though I grew up in Ohio and Pennsylvania on the edge of Lake Erie, I don’t like the cold weather.  I guess that’s why I moved to Southern California.  But it still gets cold here and is 48 degrees right now (that’s what my oracle, the iPhone says).  😉

So I thought I would share with you my favorite tea for a cold night.  I also make this tea when my throat feels scratchy, my stomach feels upset, I feel achey or anytime I just feel like I might not be as balanced as I want to be!

*  Grate frozen organic ginger root into a big mug.  I just put my flat grater over the top of the mug and go to it!   I do about a half tablespoon into the mug.

(I keep my organic ginger root, peel and all, in a little zip lock baggie in the freezer.  It’s easier and faster to slice and grate when it’s frozen.)

*  Pour boiling water over an organic ginger tea bag and steep until the temp is just right for drinking.

*  Add Sweetleaf Lemon Stevia to taste.

I sip this and my body just loves it…it also soothes my soul!

In the warmer weather I will do it in a tall glass and add cool purified water.  I add some boiling water and let it sit, then I add some ice cubes and sweetener.

I’ve also done this with sparkling water and I have also just used ginger juice by The Ginger People when I’ve felt lazy.  😉

When I make it cold and sweetened with the lemon stevia and I use sparkling water, it tastes like ginger ale.

This always brings back sweet memories as my grandmother used to give me a glass of ginger ale when I was a little girl and whenever I wasn’t feeling well.  This is just a healthier and no-sugar version of the Canada Dry Ginger Ale she used to give me.  This healthier version makes me feel nourished and cared for.  It’s something nice to do for myself.

Ginger is great for the immune and digestive systems and it’s a great anti-inflammatory herb.  It wonderful for autoimmune thyroid because it does not stimulate Th1 or Th2 (which can put an autoimmune thyroid person out of balance and initiate a flare up of symptoms).  So ginger (along with peppermint and rooibos) is a “go to tea” for me and I recommend it to all of my autoimmune thyroid clients.

And now, to sip…ahh–ahhh…

Yours in health, healing and happiness,

Dr. Elena 😉

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