My Favorite Tea For A Cold Night Or Whenever I Need Extra Balancing

Even though I grew up in Ohio and Pennsylvania on the edge of Lake Erie, I don’t like the cold weather.  I guess that’s why I moved to Southern California.  But it still gets cold here and is 48 degrees right now (that’s what my oracle, the iPhone says).  😉

So I thought I would share with you my favorite tea for a cold night.  I also make this tea when my throat feels scratchy, my stomach feels upset, I feel achey or anytime I just feel like I might not be as balanced as I want to be!

*  Grate frozen organic ginger root into a big mug.  I just put my flat grater over the top of the mug and go to it!   I do about a half tablespoon into the mug.

(I keep my organic ginger root, peel and all, in a little zip lock baggie in the freezer.  It’s easier and faster to slice and grate when it’s frozen.)

*  Pour boiling water over an organic ginger tea bag and steep until the temp is just right for drinking.

*  Add Sweetleaf Lemon Stevia to taste.

I sip this and my body just loves it…it also soothes my soul!

In the warmer weather I will do it in a tall glass and add cool purified water.  I add some boiling water and let it sit, then I add some ice cubes and sweetener.

I’ve also done this with sparkling water and I have also just used ginger juice by The Ginger People when I’ve felt lazy.  😉

When I make it cold and sweetened with the lemon stevia and I use sparkling water, it tastes like ginger ale.

This always brings back sweet memories as my grandmother used to give me a glass of ginger ale when I was a little girl and whenever I wasn’t feeling well.  This is just a healthier and no-sugar version of the Canada Dry Ginger Ale she used to give me.  This healthier version makes me feel nourished and cared for.  It’s something nice to do for myself.

Ginger is great for the immune and digestive systems and it’s a great anti-inflammatory herb.  It wonderful for autoimmune thyroid because it does not stimulate Th1 or Th2 (which can put an autoimmune thyroid person out of balance and initiate a flare up of symptoms).  So ginger (along with peppermint and rooibos) is a “go to tea” for me and I recommend it to all of my autoimmune thyroid clients.

And now, to sip…ahh–ahhh…

Yours in health, healing and happiness,

Dr. Elena 😉

Share!

3 comments

  1. Donna Phelan says:

    Thank you Elena, sounds wonderful.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Dr. Elena has been helping me with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease that occurs when the body’s own immune system begins to attack the thyroid. The thyroid gland sits at the base of your neck and is responsible for regulating metabolism. Over time the thyroid’s ability to produce hormones necessary for regulating metabolism and energy production becomes reduced and may lead to hypothyroidism. In addition to fatigue, other symptoms of hypothyroidism include weight gain, sensitivity to cold and muscle weakness. Women are at a higher risk than men for developing this condition and the risk increases with age. Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is the leading cause of hypothyroidism. Dr. Elena has told me so many times that I need to take care of myself and my immune system. I love drinking this and it helps me to nurture myself. With any autoimmune situation, one really needs to take care of oneself. Thanks, Dr. E!

  3. Kym says:

    Ginger produces a hot, fragrant kitchen spice.[5] Young ginger rhizomes are juicy and fleshy with a very mild taste. They are often pickled in vinegar or sherry as a snack or just cooked as an ingredient in many dishes. They can also be steeped in boiling water to make ginger tea, to which honey is often added; sliced orange or lemon fruit may also be added. Ginger can also be made into candy, or ginger wine which has been made commercially since 1740.:

    Talk to you later, Dr. Elena!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *