Tag Archive for digestive system

10 Easy Gluten-Free, Grain-Free, Dairy-Free, Paleo Healthy Snacks

So you have eliminated grains and dairy, you are new at this “paleo thing” and frustrated with trying to find things to eat. You may be needing to eat 6 times a day on your new program and wanting some tasty options. This doesn’t have to be boring…it’s a new chapter in your life and your health!

Some of these suggestions need refrigeration or heating up and some are just fine at room temp.

turkey roll ups1. Turkey slices rolled up (I like mine with lots of freshly ground pepper), and a dill pickle, raw sauerkraut or kim chi (I like the Rejuvenate Brand Spicy Kim Chi available at Whole Foods). Anything with “chi” in the name has to be good for our chi, right?  😉    Rejuvenate spicy kim chi and sauerkraut

 

 

 

2. Half of the protein shake you had a breakfast, which you have chilled to have later.

3. Smoked Alaskan, wild salmon (often called “lox”) with a sliced persian cucumber.

4. Shredded white meat chicken with half an avocado.

avocado half

5. Leftovers from last night’s stir fry.

6. Skinless, boneless sardines in olive oil (don’t turn your nose up…these are delicious and jam-packed with protein and omega 3’s)!  😉

I always have some of these in the office in case I need them and I when I travel I take several tins in my suitcase. They are very convenient!

sardines in olive oil

 7. Canned tuna in olive oil, with half of a lemon squeezed on it (I bring this with me when I am out all day long as it keeps well and doesn’t need refrigeration).

8. Three slices of turkey bacon which you made this morning. This also keeps great after cooking, doesn’t need refrigeration and the strips taste like “jerky” when you eat them later.

cooked turkey bacon

9. Chicken soup (which you previously made a couple of days ago so you’d have something to eat for a few days).

10. An organic apple and almond butter. red and green apples

 

There are tons of options. Get out of that headspace of “feeling deprived”…keep your mind open, try new tastes and explore the many foods available. Good luck, stay healthy and have fun with it!

cartoon of sun smiling

Yours in health, healing and happiness,

Dr. Elena 😉

Dr. Elena Michaels is a naturopathic doctor, holistic psychotherapist and clinical hypnotherapist who has been helping people access their inner healing power for over 30 years. Having personally overcome many health challenges including advanced stage cancer, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (autoimmune disease) and cardiac issues, her passion is helping others regain their health and vitality and take control of their life.    

 

90% Of Hypothyroid Patients Have Hashimoto’s – How Could This Affect You?

Most people who are dealing with low thyroid function actually have Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease. Statistics show that 27 million American have low thyroid (hypothyroid) and 90% of those with hypoythyroid have Hashimoto’s.

Thyroid hormones, color:free

Hashimoto’s is an immune disease and as with all autoimmune diseases, cannot be healed without balancing the immune system. With Hashimoto’s, the person’s immune system is attacking their own thyroid gland. There are frequently other body systems being attacked as well.

One thing I often see with thyroid patients is the preoccupation to get their TSH in range. This is like trying to put out a campfire by putting water on it while the fire is actually being continually lit from below with an unlimited amount of kindling. Basically, it’s futile.

Campfire:free

A much more effective approach is to address the immune system. Here are 3 tips for doing just that:

1. Remove offending foods that are known to cause inflammation. These are grains, dairy, sugar (yes, that means honey, maple syrup and agave) and peanuts for starters. This means, “don’t eat them at all”…not “eat them sometimes”. Being vigilant is important. Think of it like weeding a garden…consistency and diligence is what keeps out those weeds and it’s the same thing with inflammation.

If you find this difficult to do, it’s because you are addicted to the caseomorphins in dairy and the gluteomorphins in grains. (Yep, the last part of those words is like “morphine” and they are highly addictive foods.) After the first week most people adjust to not eating them and start to feel better, but everyone is different.

2. Take Vitamin D. Most people who have low thyroid function are also very low in vitamin D. It doesn’t matter if you live in a sunny climate…the hypothyroid situation often makes it difficult to absorb the vitamin D from the sun. So yes, get that sunshine because it’s great for your mood and more, but don’t depend on it for your vitamin D.

sunflower against blue sky:free

Take an emulsified version of vitamin D that has cofactors (cod liver oil and other cofactors) in the product. Capsules and tablets are more difficult for your system to absorb, liquids are better. Get your vitamin D 20 OH checked and if it’s low, supplement and then check it again in about 12 weeks. You need the D for your immune system, your mood, your brain function, your hormones and your bones.

3. Reduce stress and get more rest. Yes, I know it’s easy to say and harder to do, but it’s very important for a person with Hashimoto’s. Your body needs downtime to release and relax, take a break from what’s going on outside of you and within your own system. For free short audios to relax go to www.DrElena.com/morejoy for a 3 minute and a 7 minute audio relaxation.

Your body also needs sleep to balance your immune system. Sometimes you may need more sleep than other times. With Hashimoto’s your system may fluctuate between high thyroid and low thyroid. For example, you might go back and forth between anxiety, insomnia and diarrhea…and depression, fatigue and constipation. Whether low or high thyroid, digestive symptoms and complaints are usually present and need to be addressed.

woman sleeping:free

Remember, it’s your immune system that needs to be addressed. That is where the focus needs to be for healing.

Check out the 2 free short audios (3 minutes and 7 minutes) here and your’ll also get a short special report, “10 Keys for Bringing More Joy into Your Life”.

Yin yang with rainbow color border:free

Yours in health, healing and happiness,

Dr. Elena 😉

Dr. Elena Michaels is a naturopathic doctor, holistic psychotherapist and clinical hypnotherapist who has been helping people access their inner innate healing power for over 30 years. Having personally overcome many health challenges including cancer and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis (autoimmune disease), her passion is helping others regain their health and vitality, taking control of their life.  

 

My Favorite Tea For A Cold Night Or Whenever I Need Extra Balancing

Even though I grew up in Ohio and Pennsylvania on the edge of Lake Erie, I don’t like the cold weather.  I guess that’s why I moved to Southern California.  But it still gets cold here and is 48 degrees right now (that’s what my oracle, the iPhone says).  😉

So I thought I would share with you my favorite tea for a cold night.  I also make this tea when my throat feels scratchy, my stomach feels upset, I feel achey or anytime I just feel like I might not be as balanced as I want to be!

*  Grate frozen organic ginger root into a big mug.  I just put my flat grater over the top of the mug and go to it!   I do about a half tablespoon into the mug.

(I keep my organic ginger root, peel and all, in a little zip lock baggie in the freezer.  It’s easier and faster to slice and grate when it’s frozen.)

*  Pour boiling water over an organic ginger tea bag and steep until the temp is just right for drinking.

*  Add Sweetleaf Lemon Stevia to taste.

I sip this and my body just loves it…it also soothes my soul!

In the warmer weather I will do it in a tall glass and add cool purified water.  I add some boiling water and let it sit, then I add some ice cubes and sweetener.

I’ve also done this with sparkling water and I have also just used ginger juice by The Ginger People when I’ve felt lazy.  😉

When I make it cold and sweetened with the lemon stevia and I use sparkling water, it tastes like ginger ale.

This always brings back sweet memories as my grandmother used to give me a glass of ginger ale when I was a little girl and whenever I wasn’t feeling well.  This is just a healthier and no-sugar version of the Canada Dry Ginger Ale she used to give me.  This healthier version makes me feel nourished and cared for.  It’s something nice to do for myself.

Ginger is great for the immune and digestive systems and it’s a great anti-inflammatory herb.  It wonderful for autoimmune thyroid because it does not stimulate Th1 or Th2 (which can put an autoimmune thyroid person out of balance and initiate a flare up of symptoms).  So ginger (along with peppermint and rooibos) is a “go to tea” for me and I recommend it to all of my autoimmune thyroid clients.

And now, to sip…ahh–ahhh…

Yours in health, healing and happiness,

Dr. Elena 😉